Best of NeoCon 2014 Gold Winners Part 4


kaiThis week, we’re featuring a mashup of some of the light and lovely designs on display at NeoCon 2014. While some gold winners were plush and luxurious, these items are streamlined and modernistic.

Nucraft: Kai

Kai is named in honor of a Hawaiian word for “ocean”. In fact, it does look a bit like a knife-thin aluminum surfboard floating on air. The underside of the table is just as interesting as the top, with a special construction that supports the long, slender tabletop without bowing—even with no central column. The power and data access is cunningly concealed along the edge of the table to preserve the attractive, pristine surface above. These power units are optional and can be removed for offices that are fully wireless.

trellisKI: Trellis

This rail/beam system was crafted with flexibility at its core. The Trellis from KI gives more than lip service to the idea of modularity and easy reconfiguration, with freestanding components that snap together without any tools required. Height adjustable and fixed tables that integrate with the Trellis are also freestanding—a loose coupling that makes the entire solution quite agile.

modoDavis Furniture: Modo

Modo brings style to simplicity with a bench collection comprised of straight lines and angles that embrace the architecture of the modern office. If there are walls, corners, and long tables to be accessorized with seating, it makes sense to choose a bench that fits the contours of the existing layout. With its attractive frame, this seating can also be used to divide or enclose areas, creating inviting spaces within a large, open layout. Modo is the building block to fit a meeting room, a lobby, or a collaborative breakout space.

StirStir: Kinetic Desk

How often do workers really stir from their desk? What if there was a way to gently remind them that it’s time to get up and take a walk, stretch, or just stand for a while instead of sitting all day? This software-enabled Stir Kinetic Desk features an integrated touchscreen that allows users to interact directly with the furniture, sending it into motion with a double tap. The desk even moves on its own (with a soft up and down motion like a breath) when it’s time for a change in position. The system will interface with common fitness apps to track calories burned and time spent sitting or standing.

Join us next week for the final post in this series—featuring the Editor’s choice awards!


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